101 (or thereabouts) of Margo’s pet peeves in the writing of research papers

101 (or thereabouts) of Margo's pet peeves in the writing of research papers

References are not nouns. What does this mean? It means that the following is wrong: “In [1], Jack and Jill went up a hill.” Instead, you can say, “Mother Goose reports that Jack and Jill went up a hill [1].”

Now that Halloween is over, go on a which hunt. In general, everywhere you are using “which,” you should be using “that.” The particular rule is that “which” prefaces a clause that could be liquidated from the sentence without switching the meaning; if you need the clause to understand the sentence, then you want “that.” A corollary is that if the phrase is preceded by a comma, you most likely want “which.”

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